http://www.math.uri.edu/~eaton/Mth132F06.htm

MTH 132 Applied Calculus II-Fall 2006

MWF: 2:00-2:50PM – Wales 226

Instructor:  Nancy Eaton

Office:  Tyler 222

Phone:  874-4439

E-mail:  eaton@math.uri.edu

Office hours:  MTW 9-10AM, or by apt MTW 8-9AM

 

 

 

Take home Quiz 6 - Due Mon. Nov 27.

Students who require accommodations and who have documentation from
Disability Services (874-2098) should make arrangements with me as soon as possible. 

 

 

About the course:
This is a calculus course for students of life sciences and other areas.  The main emphasis will be on the interpretation of calculus in numerical, graphical, algebraic, as well as practical terms. The authors of the textbook have gone to great lengths to fill the book with many exciting, real-life examples, which show how calculus concepts appear in life sciences and other areas. The main topics of the course are applications of the definite integral, differential equations, and functions of many variables, chapters 6 through 11 of the textbook.

 

 

 

 Hughes-Hallet, et. al., Calculus (Second Edition).  Check Amazon

Prerequisites

 MTH 131 or equivalent

Calculators

 A graphing calculator is required – TI-83 or TI-84 recommended

 

Graphing Calculators:  We expect that you have a programmable graphing calculator and are familiar with its use.  The Quick Start guide that comes with your calculator should suffice for learning its basic use.  For further help, consult with your instructor and/or ask your classmates for guidance. Calculator use may be restricted on some exams since more advanced calculators, like the TI-89 can do some of the calculus computations that we expect you to learn to do with just pencil and paper.  You may be asked during the semester to enter some programs into your calculator.  The University of Arizona has some sample programs that you may use for this purpose for most of the different brands and models of calculators

You will find some very useful interactive programs to illustrate key calculus concepts at this site: Flash movies for calculus 

 

 

Evaluation:   

There will be 3 exams given during class.   The dates for these are Oct. 13, Nov 10, and Dec 6. The comprehensive final exam is will be given during the scheduled time on Friday Dec. 22 from 8:00 - 11:00 PM.  The exams will be taken from material that we covered in class or in homework assignments, so take careful notes and study them for the exams.  Homework assignments and quizzes will be given regularly.  Course grades will be calculated according to the following distribution:

 

Evaluation Method:

Possible points:

3 Exams

300 points

Final exam

200 points

Homework and quizzes

100 points

Total possible points

600 points

If you earn:

Your grade will be at least:

360 points

D

430 points

C

490 points

B

550 points

A

 

 

Tips for success:
 

Read the textbook. An important part of your mathematical education is acquiring the knack of learning mathematics on your own, from books.  You may not be used to reading mathematics texts, but you will be actively encouraged to read this one. By reading the text before class you will have a better chance of making good use of your time in class.  Don't worry if you don't understand everything.  Ask questions in class and read the material again later.

 

 

Come to Class.  It is very important that you don't miss any classes.  If you miss class, you will fall behind and it will be very difficult to keep up with the class after that.
 

Take Notes.  Learn to take careful notes of the examples and concepts given in class.  At the very least, copy down all examples that are put up on the board in class.

 

 

Do all the homework problems.  The homework problems are the core of this course.  The way you will learn the material is by working the homework problems.  An important purpose of the problems is to make you think through and master the ideas of the subject so that you can confidently apply your knowledge in new situations.  You don't learn much from a problem you can do immediately.  It is essential that you devote adequate time attempting to solve each assigned problem.  Discipline yourself not to check the solution manual too quickly, be willing to spend an occasional half hour or more on a challenging problem.  You may learn a great deal from honest hard work on a problem, even if you don't succeed in solving it.  Read the text material before working on the problems.  Solutions to the odd problems are in the back of your book.  You are responsible for doing all of the assigned problems.

 

 

The Exams will reflect the variety of the homework problems.   Practice exams will be handed out during class.  If you attend class, understand how to do every assigned homework problem, and the examples from the practice exams you should be well prepared for the exams.

 

 

Policies on Making up missed work:

 

 

Exams:   If you must miss an exam, follow this guide.  Ask for permission to take a makeup exam before the time of the exam, if possible, either by phone or e-mail.  If permission is given, submit a written note to me explaining why you missed the exam and attach documentation such as a doctor's note.  Schedule a makeup exam with me soon after the time of the exam.  I will strictly enforce this procedure.  Expect to get a zero on the exam if you don't follow this procedure.

 

 

Quizzes:   Quizzes are scheduled below.  No make-ups will be given for missed quizzes.  To compensate for missed quizzes due to illness or other excused absences, I will drop the two lowest quiz grades before computing your final grade. 

 

 

Classes:   It is to your benefit to attend class.  Students who attend class on a regular basis perform better on tests than those who don't.  I cover all the test material in class and go over difficult homework problems.  If you miss class for whatever reason, it is your responsibility to find out what was covered and what announcements were made.   Arrive to class on time and do not leave class early, it disrupts the class by interrupting my chain of thought when presenting material and preventing the students from keeping their attention on the work.

 

Keys to Exams

 

Key to Exam 2

 

Key to Exam 3

 

Practice for Exams

 

Practice for exam 1   Solution to Practice for exam 1

 

Practice for exam 2  Solution to Practice for Exam 2

 

Practice for exam 3 Solutions to Practice for Exam 3


SYLLABUS

The following calendar gives a timetable for the course. Your class may be slightly behind or ahead at any given time. Below the calendar is a list of sections in the textbook, with suggested problems. Some of these may be done in class, others as homework. You should attempt them all. (Note: In the problem lists, a notation like 3-9 means that all the problems 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 are assigned.)

 

Week of 

Events 

Text 

W-09/06

F-09/08

 

Chapter 3, Focus on Prac
7.1

M-09/11

W-09/13

F-09/15

 

6.1
6.4

7.2

M-09/18

W-09/20

F-09/22

 

7.3

7.4

8.1

M-09/25

W-09/27

F-09/29

-

-

Quiz 1

8.2

8.3

-

M-10/02

W-10/04

F-10/06

-

-

Quiz 2

9.1

9.2

-

W-10/11

F-10/13

 

Exam 1

Review

-

M-10/16

W-10/18

F-10/20

-

-

Quiz 3

9.3

9.4

-

 

Day 

Events 

Text 

M-10/23

W-10/25

F-10/27

-

-

Quiz 4

9.5

9.6

-

M-10/30

W-11/01

F-11/03

Drop deadline

-

Quiz 5

10.1

10.2

-

M-11/06

F-11/10

-

Exam 2

Review

-

M-11/13

W-11/15

F-11/17

-

-

Quiz 6

10.3

10.4

-

M-11/20

W-11/22

 

10.5

10.6

M-11/27

W-11/29

F-12/01

-

-

Quiz 7

Sec 10.7

Sec 11.1

-

M-12/04

W-12/06

F-12/08

-

Exam 3

-

Review

-

Sec 11.3

M-12/12

 

Extra Credit Puzzles

Friday

12/22

Final Exam

8AM-11AM

Comprehensive

                                            

 

 

Suggested Exercises

 

Section 

Problems

Section 

   Problems 

 

P. 163

All Odds

10.2

All Odds

7.1

All Odds

10.3

All Odds

6.1

All Odds

10.4

All Odds

6.4

All Odds

10.5

1 - 17 Odd, 23, 25

7.2

All Odds

10.6

1 - 21 Odd

7.3

All Odds

10.7

3 - 9 Odd

7.4

1 - 19 Odd

11.1

1 - 17 Odd

8.1

All Odds

11.3

1 - 17 Odd

8.2

All Odds

 

 

8.3

All Odds

 

 

9.1

1 - 17 Odd

 

 

9.2

5 - 15 Odd, 21 - 31 Odd

 

 

9.3

1 - 21 Odd, 29

 

 

9.4

1 - 19 Odd, 29 - 41 Odd

 

 

9.5

3 - 21 Odd

 

 

9.6

1 - 17 Odd

 

 

10.1

All Odds

 

 



URI Civility Policy

The University of Rhode Island is committed to developing and actively protecting a class environment in which respect must be shown to everyone in order to facilitate the expression, testing, understanding, and creation of a variety of ideas and opinions. Rude, sarcastic, obscene or disrespectful speech and disruptive behavior have a negative impact on everyone's learning and are unacceptable. The course instructor will have disruptive persons removed from the class.